Making/Breaking the Binary: Women, Art, & Technology 1968-1985

Kelsey Halliday Johnson

2016
$60,000

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Riddles of the Sphinx, 1977, film still, directed Laura Mulvey and Peter Wollen. Photo courtesy of British Film Institute.

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Making/Breaking the Binary: Women, Art & Technology (1968-85), 2017, installation view, Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery, ephemera and timeline of the history of women in technology. Photo by Studio LHOOQ, courtesy of Kelsey Halliday Johnson.

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"Making/Breaking the Binary: Women, Art & Technology (1968-85)", 2017, installation view, Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery. Pictured: Catherine Jansen, "Sewing Space", 1981, xerography on cloth, thread, embroidery. Photo by Studio LHOOQ, courtesy of Kelsey Halliday Johnson.

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Suzanne Ciani in performance, 2016, Red Bull Music Academy. Photo by Maria Jose Govea.

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Jennifer Bartlett, Fixed/Variable (Summer '72), 1972, enamel over silkscreen grid on baked enamel steel plates. Photo by Tom Powel, courtesy of Locks Gallery.

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Dara Birmbaum, Technology/Transformation: Wonder Woman, 1978-79, 5:50 min, color, sound. Courtesy of Electronic Arts Intermix

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Making/Breaking the Binary: Women, Art & Technology (1968-85), 2017, installation view, Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery. Pictured (L to R): Howardena Pindell, Lynda Benglis, Shigeko Kubota, Pati Hill, Mary Ross, Beryl Korot. Photo by Studio LHOOQ, courtesy of Kelsey Halliday Johnson.

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The Buchla instrument, invented by Don Buchla. Photo by Jamie Alvarez.

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Sonia Landy Sheridan, Sonia through Her Bra, c 1970s, 3M VQC on paper, Collection of the Hood Museum of Art.

Curator Kelsey Halliday Johnson presents the exhibition Making/Breaking the Binary: Women, Art, & Technology 1968-1985, surveying a generation of pioneering female artists and relating their work to the technology innovators who helped shape the information age. The exhibition includes visual artists such as Jennifer Bartlett and Lynda Benglis, and video and media art pioneers Sonia Landy Sheridan, Joan Jonas, Lynda Benglis, Shigeko Kubota, and Dara Birnbaum. To accompany the exhibition, Johnson created a reading library that places these artists into direct dialogue with a broader history of women in technology, with the aim to "further the scholarship of technology and art surveys in which women are under-represented or not contextualized in the field of their peers," Johnson says. Featured technologists include Ada Lovelace, the first computer programmer; Katherine Johnson, NASA's "human computer;" Mary Allen Wilkes, inventor of the operating system; and Rebecca Allen, the first Emmy Award-winning computer animation artist; among others.


Additional unrestricted funds are added to each grant for general operating support.