Mark Thomas Gibson

2021 PEW FELLOW
Updated
15 Feb 2022

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Mark sits on a black office chair in his studio. Blue painters tape frames the wall behind him, half covered by an in-progress work. He has dark skin and short black hair and wears a black button-up shirt, black shorts, and bright blue glasses.

Mark Thomas Gibson, 2021 Pew Fellow. Photo by Ryan Collerd.

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Mark sits on a black office chair in his studio. Blue painters tape frames the wall behind him, half covered by an in-progress work. He has dark skin and short black hair and wears a black button-up shirt, black shorts, and bright blue glasses.

Mark Thomas Gibson, 2021 Pew Fellow. Photo by Ryan Collerd.

mark-thomas-gibson-pew-fellow-2021-09-web.jpg

Mark stands with his arms crossed in his studio. Blue painters tape frames the wall behind him, half covered by an in-progress work. He has dark skin and short black hair and wears a black button-up shirt, black shorts, and bright blue glasses.

Mark Thomas Gibson, 2021 Pew Fellow. Photo by Ryan Collerd.

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A dense black and white ink drawing on canvas featuring protest signs, a liberty bell, hands and legs, and a "Black Lives Matter" banner.

Pew Fellow Mark Thomas Gibson, Proclaim Liberty Throughout All The Land, 2020; ink on canvas, 66" x 89.5."

“Like an overextended peninsula at the edge of the world, my work acts as the soil between two bodies of water: Historical Truth and Personal Truth.”

Visual artist Mark Thomas Gibson (he/his) chronicles race, class, and contemporary American culture with a historian’s eye on the past. His paintings, collages, prints, caricatures, graphic novels, and other works explore the potential of narrative art to provoke examinations of power structures and racism and to foster empathy. Gibson says he uses elements of caricature and the comic form “to mock and invert power relations” in works that reflect and record a shared understanding of contemporary political and social events. He has released two artist’s books: Early Retirement (2017), featuring over 200 pen-and-ink drawings, and Some Monsters Loom Large (2016). Gibson has received a Hodder Fellowship from Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. He teaches painting at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art and Architecture, and he earned an MFA from the Yale School of Art and a BFA from The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art.