Emily Bate

2021 PEW FELLOW
Updated
15 Feb 2022

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Emily stands amidst flowering trees with pink and yellow blossoms. She has light skin, dark blond hair and blue eyes and wears a bright blue shirt with black graphic pattern.

Emily Bate, 2021 Pew Fellow. Photo by Ryan Collerd.

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Emily grins joyfully at the camera. She has light skin, dark blonde hair, and blue eyes with gold eye shadow. She wears a bright blue shirt with black designs and has a nose ring. Blurry blossoming tress are visible behind her.

Emily Bate, 2021 Pew Fellow. Photo by Ryan Collerd.

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Emily stands looking right towards the camera. Her face is framed by the branches of a flowering tree with pink blossoms. She has light skin, dark blonde hair, and blue eyes and is wearing a bright blue shirt with a graphic black pattern.

Emily Bate, 2021 Pew Fellow. Photo by Ryan Collerd.

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Pew Fellow Emily Bate performs at the Guggenheim Museum, 2021, New York, NY. Photo by Paula Court.

“I’m interested in reuniting people with their rightful inheritance as sound-makers and bringing us back together in communal music-making.”

Emily Bate (she/her) is a composer and vocalist who writes and performs works that focus on group singing and blend elements of theater, performance art, and choral and experimental music. With a background in experimental theater and cabaret, Bate works primarily in live settings as both a performer and a facilitator of collaborative performance. She defines artistic excellence as “a willingness to stay humble and fluid in my role, to increase other peoples’ access to artistic expression, and to stay alert to all the contradictory feelings we generate as we create or witness.” Bate founded and conducts Trust Your Moves, a no-audition, 65-member queer community chorus centered on gender liberation and co-creation. The group commissions and performs work by queer and transgender composers. Bate has received an Art is Essential grant from the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, two Art and Change grants from the Leeway Foundation, a grant from the MAP Fund, and a fellowship from the Independence Foundation.